The Atlas Society Asks Kevin Sorbo

October 25, 2023 00:32:41
The Atlas Society Asks Kevin Sorbo
The Atlas Society Presents - The Atlas Society Asks
The Atlas Society Asks Kevin Sorbo

Oct 25 2023 | 00:32:41

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Show Notes

Join CEO Jennifer Grossman for a special episode of The Atlas Society Asks where she interviews actor, producer, and director Kevin Sorbo, who joins to talk about the new independent film produced with his wife, Sam Sorbo, "The Miracle in East Texas," TO BE RELEASED IN THEATERS NATIONWIDE ON OCTOBER 29 & 30. 

Kevin Sorbo clearly needs no introduction, as most of our audience knows him as an actor, producer, and director, famous for his starring roles in Hercules: The Legendary Journeys and Gene Rodenberry’s Andromeda. He is also the author of several books, including True Strength: My Journey from Hercules to Mere Mortal—and How Nearly Dying Saved My Life and the children's book The Test of Lionhood.

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Episode Transcript

[00:00:00] Speaker A: Hello everyone, and welcome to the 176th episode of the Atlas Society. Asks. My name is Jennifer Anju Grossman. Everyone calls me Jag. I'm the CEO of the Atlas Society. We are the leading nonprofit introducing young people to the ideas of Ein Rand. Today we are joined by Kevin Sorbo, who needs very little introduction. I want to though, remind you to go ahead. You can type in your questions to Zoom, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn. We'll try to get to a couple of them, but we are going to have a bit of an abbreviated program today. Kevin has already done, I think, eleven interviews today and I don't know how many thousands over the past five weeks. So he's got a commitment after this. So we are just going to dive almost right into it. But first, I want to tell you a little bit about why he is here with us today. Of course, all of you know him as an actor, a producer, director, famous for his starring roles in Hercules, The Legendary Journeys and Gene Roddenberry's. Andromeda he's also the author of several books including True Strength my Journey from Hercules to Mere Mortal and How Nearly Dying Saved My Life. And also more recently, he came out with a children's book, The Test of Lionhood. He is here, however, to talk about his new independence film produced with his wife, Sam Sorbo, The Miracle in East Texas. It's about to be released across theaters nationwide this weekend. I see it's playing nearby. I plan to go, and so should you. So, Kevin, thanks for joining us. [00:01:50] Speaker B: Thanks for having me. It's good to see you again. It's been a while. [00:01:53] Speaker A: I know. All right. So we met through your wife Sam, who's spoken at our conferences. Emceed at our galas, was among the first guests of this podcast. Part of the bond that Sam and I shared is our mutual appreciation for the literature of Ayn Rand. Wondering if you've read any of Rand's work and whether her ideas had any impact on you. [00:02:17] Speaker B: Yeah, I read them years ago and I thought it was pretty interesting and pretty predicting what was going to happen down the road as well. And we're kind of living in that world as we speak. I mean, if someone told me five years ago we would be where we are with this woke thing and canceled culture and hatred and anger divisiveness in this country, I would have said, come on, it can't get that bad. But it was starting to get bad 2030 years ago. It's just accelerated on itself now. And it's just amazing that we're at look what's going on in Israel right now. I look at the protests going on our college campuses, and I'm just wondering if these college students have any real history of understanding the history of what happened in that land area. But that's a whole nother subject. I'd rather talk about my movie. [00:03:04] Speaker A: All right, well, before diving into your new film, I wanted to spend just a beat on your memoir, True Strength, the audio version of which I cannot recommend enough, of course. It's narrated by you and your wife, Sam. In it, you recount the near death experience of the aneurysm that you had in your shoulder, which resulted in three strokes, and the just bone crushingly, arduous journey to recovery. Anyone dealing with a life threatening illness or a debilitating injury should read it, though those who know you from your film career might not be aware of your struggle. What did these experiences teach you? [00:03:50] Speaker B: Well, quickly, how it all happened. It was in the season five of Hercules. We're just wrapping up the season, and I was having all kinds of problems with my left shoulder. My hand was cold and numb. I couldn't figure what was going on with my left arm. It was weird. My ego I was doing my own stunts because my ego said that I could, and I enjoyed doing them. And I was always getting cuts and bumps and bruises, sprains, whatever. So I just kind of blew it off. I flew back to America and just to do publicity on my first big budget movie called Call the Conqueror. And I got to a point that I had to go see my doctor. They found a lump way up here before they could do anything about it, it basically opened up and sent hundreds of clots onto my arm, but it's actually four stroked because the speech went as well. But that one dissolved rather quickly, thank God. But I spent the next four months learning how to walk and balance again. It took me three years to fully recover, to get past all the things that had going on. Vertigo, loss of sight, loss of balance. All kinds of issues were going on with it. And I didn't want to write the book. My wife kind of made me write it, and it was years later. It's the guy's ego, right? You don't want to show how weak you become. I'm here. I'm playing Hercules. I'm 63, I'm 225 pounds. I'm ripped up 32 inch waist, 46 inch chest, and I'm like, I feel like I'm on top of the world, invincible. And sure enough, I have this thing happen to me. So it was a tough road to go through, but I wrote the book, and I'm grateful that I wrote it now, because not only was therapeutic for me, but when I started doing the book signing on it, I had people from all walks of life come to the Barnes and Nobles, all these book signings they did across the country, and they would be like, I read your book. 20 years old, 80 years old, whatever it may be. There are car crash survivors, cancer survivors, stroke survivor, whatever it may be. Your book made me stop feeling sorry for myself. Your book made me laugh. Your book made me appreciate that the life is still here in front of me, and it's up to me to get past this roadblock that I've hit, because everybody's got a story. I don't sit and say my story is better than anybody else's. We're all going to hit roadblocks in our life. How do you react those roadblocks? You want to blame God, a God believe in you want to blame family, friend, the government, whatever it may be. The reality is you got to look in the mirror. I say, Here, cue the Michael Jackson song and the man in the mirror. You got to look at that person and say, okay. As Sam said to me all the time, she goes, It happened. What are you going to do about it? So I just pushed on and really pushed on. Honestly. I also say I don't know what I would have done without her constant nagging. It was very helpful to me in many ways. [00:06:13] Speaker A: Nagging. [00:06:14] Speaker B: Yeah. So the book came out and it opened the road to speaking engagements for me, something I never thought I'd be doing. I've been doing them now for about eleven years now, and it's been a gift, sort of this interesting sideline job, but it's been amazing the response I get from people when I go and talk at these events. I spoke in front of 1600 Neurologists out in San Diego, and I said, there's a reason what they call what you do a practice. And I don't think they appreciated that. But I meant that well. [00:06:43] Speaker A: No, there was a lot of humility to go around and it's just a beautifully written, beautifully narrated book. As somebody who reads a lot of fiction, when I have to dive into these nonfiction books, I'm like, oh, gosh. Except this was just the kind of book that was a page turner and you couldn't put it down. And like you said, everybody goes through something. I remember well, you guys might. When I lost my house back in 2007, we used to be kind of neighbors out here in California. One thing that guided how I handled it was the idea that every situation can be made worse. In other words, the way you handle one loss of one value can jeopardize your other values, your job, your relationships, your mental health. True Strength recounts a showdown that you had with Sam in which she challenged you not to take your anger, and there is a lot of anger about your health situation out on her. Any advice you'd share for those viewers who are dealing with a life threatening illness or a loss, lessons you learned over the course of your recovery that they might benefit from? [00:07:59] Speaker B: Well, I think patience, I think things changed for me drastically. I was burning the candle at both ends. I was working 18 hours door to door on Hercules, between the drive time being on set, 1213 hours, 14 hours a day, lifting weights every day and surviving on 4 hours of sleep over five years. I'm sure that had something to do with something with my health. You need more than 4 hours of sleep lost. The ability to remember any dreams, if I had dreams at all. Because I remember getting home, eating a late meal, studying my lines for next day, going to bed at 1234 30, the alarm would go off and to me it was like 2 seconds. I mean, I just, boom. Would be out and right away get up and do it again. Not complaining. I loved being on that show. I loved Hercules. I mean, it actually became the most watched TV show in the world. 176 countries, and it opened the door for me the rest of my life, my career. I'm grateful that the Universal Studios, they didn't do it out of the goodness of their heart. I mean, we were the most watched show in the world making money. They kept the series going. So I went back to do season six, and I went from a 14 hours day down one to 2 hours a day. So I couldn't do much more. They brought a lot of stunt casting. And when I say stunt casting, other actors that people know who they are to hopefully keep the show going. But it gave me light at the end of a very long and dark tunnel. And I think that's what you need. You have to find hope and all the negativity that happens in our lives, because God didn't promise you an easy life. So for me, it was like, okay, this is here, it's in front of me. I got to push myself to get better now because it would wipe me out. I mean, my brain would get so wiped out just being around people. I didn't drive for two years. I couldn't handle it, the cars going by and everything. It was too much for my brain to take. But I kept pushing myself because I'm a jock. It was that no pain, no gain mentality. So if I wipe my brain out by too much stuff coming in, that was a good thing. Even though it took me three days to sort of recover again. But I saw little bits, tiny steps of improvement that I knew that I was getting better and I knew that I would get better. I think people react the same way when bad things happen. You blame God. You blame a God you don't believe, and you blame the world. Stop doing that. It happened. It happened. What are you going to do about it? That's huge. It was huge for me, and it's been huge for people now that have read my book. And you talk about audiobooks when we lived in La, we live in Florida now. We left five years ago. When we lived in La. Sam and I would listen to audiobooks all the time. I mean, the best place to do it. And when you're stuck in La traffic, La traffic, get something to take your mind off it and have a little learning session of some kind. So they're huge to have. But I'll tell you, talk about the fires. You remember in 2018, the fires came through again, and I was in Indianapolis when Sam called me up. She had, the fires are starting up again, but they're like 30 miles. I said okay. I get a call from her at three in the morning, my time. I was in Indianapolis. East coast time. She says, we have to get out of the house. I said what? So I go to my computer, I turn on KTLA, and I'm watching KTLA show the fires. And I said, put down the streets. And it was my neighborhood in Westlake Village, in three homes. I live on a dead end street. Three of the homes completely engulfed in flames, one next to me. I figured, my home is done. I get up the next morning, there's nothing I could do. I had a speaking event with Steve Green from Hobby Lobby, and I said, I got it. Can I speak first? I got to get out of here. 2100 people stood up and prayed for my house. I thought, wow. That was, like, amazing. I get home, cops wouldn't let me go. I had to go visit. I had to go to the house. My family's at Simi Valley. I get back the next day, I get to the house, house next to me, gone. The fire came within 3ft of a house and went around the house. [00:11:28] Speaker A: Yet another reason to be grateful that you have left California, because especially in Malibu and Westlake Village, it's not a question of if, but when. So my piece of advice for anybody who's dealing with a really debilitating health challenge is to listen to this audiobook. If you're an audiobook fan like myself or get the book. [00:11:52] Speaker B: Go to Sorbostudios.com, I'll send you an autograph copy. [00:11:56] Speaker A: All right? Okay. Well, we'll put that link in there. And it was not just about learning about your journey, your career, the amazing achievement of your marriage, and talk about a practice that you guys have continued to work on. But it also gave a bit of an insight for some of us who can be a little cynical about Hollywood, how hard people work in that industry, and how creative they need to be with production. And so that was just kind of an interesting educational opportunity. So, speaking of production, let us turn now to your film, The Miracle in East Texas, which, as mentioned, it's going to be released in theaters nationwide this coming weekend. It's based on a true story. [00:12:48] Speaker B: It is a true story. It was right in the heart of the Depression in 1930, where two con men, played by myself and John Ratzenberger, who was amazing in this movie, they would go through Oklahoma and Texas and they would woo widows out of their money on fake oil wells. They would sell 500% of the shares so five times its actual value, declare a dry hole, go to the next town. They get to Kilgore, Texas. They strike oil totally by accident. Ends up being the largest oil fine in the history of the world. And of course they get arrested because the 500% they can't pay everybody back and all the widows that they ripped off find out about. They're there for the trial. So the miracle is not only did they find oil, but it's the miracle that happens afterwards. And I don't want to give that part away. But it airs this weekend on Sunday, Monday the 29th and the 30 October. If you go to Sorbostudios.com, you can press the link for Miracle East Texas. Put your zip code in. It shows you what theater is near you. And we're fathom event it looks as a $3 million movie. Okay? Hollywood does 300 million dollar movies, right? So we got to compete against that. And they have 100 million dollar advertising budget. We don't we got to rely on word of mouth. And people stop me all the time and say I love your movies. What if God's not dead? Soul surfer, let there be light. Make more. I'm making them. But you guys got to support them because theater owners don't care what they show. They want to sell popcorn and sodas. They don't care. So if you help to make this movie a big hit over that Sunday, Monday coming up, we'll get more screening times and days. It's PG rated folks. And it's a wonderful, wonderful you got John Ratzberger, you got Tyler Maine who is a WWF fighter. Great guy. You got lou gossip, Jr. Right here. Lou's awesome in it. My wife Sam is in it as well. She kind of steals the movie at the end in the courts case. But it's a wonderful, wonderful true PG rated that you can take a whole family to. There's no woke stuff in it. It's pro america. It's pro freedom, it's pro redemption. It's a wonderful capitalist, pro capitalist movie. We're educating people on oil. People want to get rid of oil. Then I said then you better start living the life of non oil. Get rid of your cell phone, get rid of your computer, get rid of a lot of your clothes, get rid of your toothbrush, your hairdryer. The list goes on. And there's hundreds of products. I challenge people go online after this and look up oil products and you're going to get this massive list. People need to wake up to what the reality of how important oil is. It's a God gift to the world. [00:15:09] Speaker A: So I want to appeal to the self interest of all of the objectivists out there seeing this movie. Not only will you have a great time and really enjoy it, but you will also be demonstrating demand for the kind of content that Kevin and his wife puts out. [00:15:31] Speaker B: Can I say real quick, it's won ten film festivals. Everything from best comedy to judge's favorite, family favorite. It's won ten different film festivals. It's a good movie. [00:15:40] Speaker A: Amazing. So $3 million budget. Every film production brings its own unique set of challenges. What were some that you overcame with this film? [00:15:52] Speaker B: You know what, we had to put it together so quickly, we were able to get it funded once again, just like it has got to be a god thing. Sam and I were speaking at an event out in Palm Springs, and afterwards we're both signing our books. And this gentleman walks up because one of the questions they asked, how difficult is to fund independent movies? And I said, well, we don't ask for a lot of money. And the movies that we make, people make money back because we're not having the Hollywood. If you look at Galaxy Quest or whatever they're called, those are like they need to make 800 million to break even, but they make 2 billion worldwide. So they keep making them. We don't have to have that kind of money make it. But he slides across this piece of paper. I looked at it and he says, can you make a movie out of that? And I said yes, I can. That's how it got funded. And we decided we want to do it right away. We shot up in Canada. I know people are going Canada's, not Texas, but we use the location. We shot in the same working Western ranch that Clint East would use in Unforgiven. So if it's good enough for Clint, it's good enough for Kevin. Sorbo I'll tell you that much, right? So you get the bigger tax credit, you get a bigger dollar per dollar average. And people are unaware. They think everything's shot in Hollywood. Maybe sitcoms are most shows are shot in Vancouver, Toronto, Georgia, Louisiana, Oklahoma. I mean, not that much stuff shoots in the state of California. So we shot it up there. And I think the biggest challenge was putting together as quick as we did, because we talked to a production company up there that I've worked with before, and I said, we got to get this ready in three weeks. They said what? Even independent movies are going to take usually six to eight weeks to get everything rolling. We got sets, built, everything within three weeks, which was amazing. The crew that we had up there is the same crew I did a movie with about gosh, how long ago was that one? It's probably about five years before that one. But it was the same crew that I've used before, and they were fantastic. And I did another movie with them that released in theaters this January that I directed called Left Behind, rise of the Antichrist, based on the Left Behind books that Jerry Jenkins and Tim Lahay did I highly recommend those ones as well. But I think that was the biggest thing, was just putting that crew together that quickly, and we did it. It was amazing. [00:18:06] Speaker A: So the movie is at once an improbable love story, an improbable entrepreneurial success, the story of men overcoming their wayward ways to find integrity. But it's also a story about overcoming racial divides and prejudice. In that respect, it shows how capitalism acts as a force to break down bigotry. Your character, Doc Boyd, at one point says, when I see money, I don't see black, I don't see white, I see green. And that's the only color that concerns me. What does that aspect of the film have to teach us today? [00:18:49] Speaker B: Well, I think that I never even thought about racism until I'm sorry, I got to say, until Obama became president, he brought it to the forefront again. I've got plenty of black friends that I know, and I was just like, isn't it amazing that I think that the country seemed to be going in a really pretty good direction? And then all of a sudden, through public education, through universities, and through Washington, DC. It became a huge issue again. And everything was called that's race. My kids all the time. Doesn't matter what I say. They say it as a joke, of course. I'll walk in and say, oh, man, I had a horrible day on the golf course. That's racist, dad. They just say it just to be. [00:19:24] Speaker A: Must be the white supremacy. [00:19:26] Speaker B: Must be white supremacy. So it's just they brought it back when to me, it was going away, and it's really sad. It was all done on purpose. I mean, you look at guys like know, Jesse Jackson and Reverend Sharpton, where the heck his name is. They make their living off of want. They want to keep it alive. They want to go after companies and say, we're going to come after you and say you're racist unless you give us a million dollars for our foundation. I mean, it's amazing. It's like total blackmail when they do this. Not to be meant as a pun, but I mean, it's just weird that we're going through this again and it's unfortunate. This movie shows there's certainly probably more racism back in the 1930 than it was going in the world up until the last ten years. And this shows blacks and whites working together. In fact, there's a scene in there where John Ratzenberger's character says, they said, I never thought I'd see this blacks and white working together because this oil find brought prosperity to blacks and whites in that community. Capitalism brought prosperity to it. I've worked with actors that's claimed they're socialists and all that. And I said, then you should feel guilty of the money you're making in this industry. You should give a lot of it know, because I don't care what Hollywood says. It's a capitalist business. They can go on their woke crap and believe in socialism and communism behind closed doors. They're capitalists and they know it. I mean, you look at China. China told communist government, but when it comes to capitalism, they're a capitalist government. [00:20:52] Speaker A: So one of the aspects of the film that I enjoyed and struck me as unusual was that the protagonists were older. And again, this was based on a true story. But the two leading characters, obviously all of the widows that they had swindled, eventually they were finding redemption, finding love in the autumn of their years. Ours is often described as a youth obsessed culture. What can the movie tell us about finding purpose and fulfillment after the bloom is off the rose? [00:21:30] Speaker B: Well, we're a youth world. We're a youth culture. Everything deals with commercials, television, movies, deals with young, young, young. Stay young as long as you can. And so we fall in that trap. Aging is something that you can't stop. I mean, it's going to happen. I wish I was still 35 years old. I'm not, and the mirror tells me so. But the reality is, I think in any age of life, it depends on your attitude. If you're going to let fear control your life, you're not going to go anywhere. But if you're going to look at things in a more positive way, bad things, like I said, happen to all of us, and it happens all the time. You got to find a place. Jimmy Buffett said, may he rest in peace. I was a big fan of his music. He said, you better find humor in everything because it's going to be a pretty long life for you if you're going to make the bad things that happen to us, because we all have bad things happen if you let that control your life. Because if you're going to live your life just being angry and down and just pissed off at the world, not a great way to live out your life. They're not a great way to walk or go through life. So to me, you got to find the humor in everything. And that's why I think I like doing humor. There's a lot of humor in this movie. People will love it. [00:22:35] Speaker A: All right, I'm going to squeeze in a couple of questions from the audience because otherwise they'll get very pissed off at me. Rick Robin? Kagnan asks Cole the Conqueror. Big fan here. Have you, Kevin, ventured into voice acting? [00:22:51] Speaker B: I have done some voice acting. I wish I could do more. But I did a thing called the Conduit. I did god of War Three. I remember I went to I mean, I still get invited to these Comic Con shows because of Hercules andromeda but there's a thing in Indianapolis called GenCon, which is all just gamers. And I must have signed 500 of these DVD covers in two days at this place. And these guys would walk up to me at the God of War Three and go, man, you're awesome in this. Sorry I had to kill you at the end, but you're really good. But I would love to do more. I do a lot of narration. I've done a lot of narration for documentaries. I've done about nine documentaries now. I've got two coming out next year, ironically. I was just in Israel filming one of them, so that attack could have happened anytime while I was there. But I do a lot of voiceover that way, and I enjoy doing just I have a voice agent. But who knows? Maybe there's a blacklist in Hollywood because I'm Christian and a conservative. [00:23:55] Speaker A: All right, speaking of which, my modern Gault on Instagram asks, what do you think has been the most difficult thing to deal with since Hollywood decided to cancel you? And maybe just talk a little bit about that, because you are one of the singular voices out there that is outspoken about ideas that don't conform to the kind of left woke narrative. [00:24:22] Speaker B: Well, you know, it's interesting. Hollywood used to be a completely conservative business. The Warner Brothers. Former Warner Studios. They were Jewish and they were conservative. Hollywood, for the most part, was pretty conservative up until the 60s. Things changed in the Welfare Reform Act. We took the Bible out of the school, the hippie movement, free love, rock and roll, Vietnam War, all these things. Hollywood started doing more celebration of the antihero. The rating system happened during that time as well. For me. My manager and agent called me in. They said, we can't work it anymore. This is a dozen years ago. And I went, what? They said, well, it's going to be hard to get you out there because you're vocal on Facebook. Facebook actually took me down, too, for speaking the truth. Zuckerberg's a wuss, but he doesn't like the truth. But anyway, I laughed. I should have been mad about it, but I said, you guys scream for tolerance. You scream for freedom of speech. But Hollywood is just as hypocritical critical as Washington DC is. They say these things, but it's all a one way street with them. It's our way or the highway. And it's unfortunate. I don't harbor that kind of anger towards people with a different point of view. I still have atheist friends, agnostic friends, liberal friends. We give each other a hard time. We have a know, but we're still friends. We go golfing together, we go have a beer. I mean, it's weird that we've gotten to this place because of public education universities where they brainwash these kids to have such an angry attitude towards anybody who's on the right side, and I am. [00:25:46] Speaker A: As the only Republican in a family of all Democrats, I guess I learned how to get along with people who have different points of view very early on. There's a lot more to life than politics. So, Kevin, you're famous for playing these hyper masculine. Roles, and one would be hard pressed, obviously, to find a more masculine character than Hercules Ayn Rand. Also dramatized even stylized masculine virtues. What's going on with this culture in which masculinity is stigmatized as toxic and there seems to be an agenda to make sexuality and gender fluid? [00:26:29] Speaker B: Well, I think the feminist movement sort of kicked it off about making softer men. I don't understand why we want men to be women and women to be men, to have an androgynous society. [00:26:39] Speaker A: I don't think most do either, do I? [00:26:41] Speaker B: They have that voice to do it. But I mean, to me, yeah, the vocal minority. You look at sitcoms, even going back in the 70s, you look at a lot of the sitcoms, the dad was always kind of chunking out of shape. The mom's a babe. The kids are smart ass teenagers, and they're using dad as a target for everything. The dad's a dummy and an idiot. So kids have been growing up for the last 50 years thinking that the father figure is not that important for the family. When the father figure is equally as important as the mother, it's important for both of them to be around the family. They both have equal things that they share, but they also have different things that they're both good for the family as well. And I embrace Masculinity. I think it's crazy. That the emasculation of society. There's nothing wrong with you don't have to be a Dwayne Johnson, okay? You don't have to be this big, muscle bound person. A strong father is really just a strong man is just somebody that is willing to protect his family, protect to be a supplier for his family. That's not saying that a woman can't supply for the family as well. But I grew up, my mom raised five kids. She was a nurse, but she raised five kids. I'm the fourth of five. My dad was a schoolteacher. School teacher's salary on 7th and 8th grade kids on five kids. I don't know how they did it, but they taught us all to be hardworking, to be not hand, expecting handouts to not give up. Today's world, they give up once, and it's your fault. Oh, my God. It's your fault that I'm this way. So I'm going to join Antifa and be angry at the world right now. I mean, it's amazing to me that we're letting these punks do what they're doing to businesses and schools and all this kind of stuff. Make me president. I can solve a lot of the world problems right now. People call. [00:28:20] Speaker A: Yeah, you have our endorsement. Okay. Well, speaking of masculinity, just maybe a word about your newest the Children's book. A lot of our viewers, a lot of our donors are always just really crying out for books that have a positive, wholesome message for kids. So tell us a little bit about the genesis of that. [00:28:43] Speaker B: It's called the test of linehood. And it came my way through the people. Braid Books. Go to Braidbooks.com, get an autographed copy from me, join from one year every month to get a new book. These are books for like four to twelve year olds. And my book, it's about letting kids be kids. I'm getting hacked by the alphabet crowd. And I was saying I'm anti this and anti that. I'm not anti anything. I'm pro kid. I'm pro child. That's what I am. It's a simple story about Lucas the lion cub. Lucas is out playing in the woods with his two little sisters. She gets cut by a plant that he knows is a very dangerous plant that she'll die if she doesn't get the treatment for it. He's too far away from home. He's closer to the mountain that has the flower that his father told him will save his little sister's life. So he's got to get past his insecurities and fears and roadblocks and find a way to man up a little bit and get out there. This book is nothing anti anything. Like I said, this book is just a wonderful kid story about finding your own battle against fear. Because we all can have fear in our lives. But fear is government's favorite weapon. They use it amazingly during COVID didn't they? [00:29:48] Speaker A: Oh, yeah. [00:29:49] Speaker B: It's just a wonderful, wonderful, fun book. If you remember last year, Kirk Cameron had a book out with Brave book as well. They wouldn't let them read at public libraries. They were okay with drag queens reading a seven year olds. But apparently Kirk Cameron is too scary for seven year olds. It's just this whole, once again, this cancel culture. I want to meet these people. I would like to meet all the cancel culture people because obviously they have led amazingly perfect and sin free lives. These are amazing, amazing people that have nothing to be embarrassed about in their life. So I'm sorry, that's sarcasm if you didn't get it. [00:30:21] Speaker A: All right, so again, just where do I'm sure a lot of people, including yours truly, are going to want to get those autographed books. So we go to tell us where. [00:30:30] Speaker B: Sorbostudios.com they go there to get the book. Sorbostudios.com plus they can get the movie tickets right now for Miracle in East Texas. [00:30:39] Speaker A: Well, folks, you are not going to want to miss this movie. It's spectacular. Just briefly, what's next for you and Sam? [00:30:48] Speaker B: We've been doing a lot of speaking events. I just got back from Grand Rapids speaking up there. I do about 15 speaking events a year. We got a waiver for two movies coming up that I'm doing. So I'm shooting a movie in Flint, Michigan. Another one in Fort Worth. I'm doing a Christmas movie there. The one in Flint, Michigan is a true story about a woman that was in stage four breast cancer and still wanted to carry her baby to full term. It's a very wonderful, touching story. I've got two documentaries that are almost complete that will be out next year, and one's called The Quest for the Throne dealing with through archaeological digs in Israel, we trace the flow of the Ark of the Covenant. So I was really Indiana Jones. And then I got the other one called Eating with the Enemy, which deals with the Last Supper that's coming out at Easter. And it's a pretty amazing documentary on that. And I've got four of the movies in post production. And I've got another documentary, I start in January, so I'm staying busy. [00:31:41] Speaker A: Plus a lot of other interviews even later than this one for you. [00:31:45] Speaker B: There I do. [00:31:48] Speaker A: Oh, my God. All right, so just best way to. [00:31:50] Speaker B: Keep track of you, storebostudios.com, best place to go newsletter. You can sign up there. My wife is on that same site with me. You can go to her side of it or go to my side of it, or both sides of it. She has a lot of great books as well. She's got a wonderful book called Words for warriors. [00:32:08] Speaker A: I think you'll I know, I've read it. We had her on to talk about it. [00:32:11] Speaker B: Very cool. [00:32:12] Speaker A: All right, well, thank you, Kevin. And thanks all of you for joining us today. If you enjoyed this video or any of our other materials and programs, please consider making a tax deductible donation to the Atlas [email protected] and join us next week when Jim Pethu Kukis is going to join us to talk about his new book, the Conservative Futurist how to Create the Sci-fi World We Were Promised. I'll see you then.

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