The Atlas Society Asks Ed Dowd

July 26, 2023 00:58:18
The Atlas Society Asks Ed Dowd
The Atlas Society Presents - The Atlas Society Asks
The Atlas Society Asks Ed Dowd

Jul 26 2023 | 00:58:18

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Show Notes

Join CEO Jennifer Grossman for the 162nd episode of The Atlas Society Asks, where she interviews Phinance Technologies' founding partner Ed Dowd about his book "Cause Unkown: The Epidemic of Sudden Deaths in 2021 and 2022" where he encourages a data-driven discussion regarding two questions in a post-COVID world: 1) What has caused this historic spike in deaths among younger people? 2) What has caused the shift from old people, who are expected to die, to younger people, who are expected to keep living?

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Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:00:00 Hello everyone, and welcome to the 162nd episode of the Atlas Society asks, my name is Jennifer Anju Grossman. My friends call me Jag. I am the c e o of the Atlas Society. We're the leading nonprofit organization introducing young people to the ideas of ay ran in fun, creative ways, like graphic novels and animated videos. Today we are joined by Ed Dowd. Before I even begin to introduce our guest, I wanna remind all of you who are watching us on Zoom, Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, uh, use the comment section to type in your questions, and we will get to as many of them as we can. So, our guest today, ed Dowd, is a founding partner of the global investment firm Finance Technologies. Previously, he spent a decade at BlackRock, where, uh, at managing director, he added 12 billion to the growth fund. Uh, he managed over the course of his Wall Street career, he earned a reputation for a keen ability to understand markets, analyze statistics, and identify trends. Speaker 0 00:01:10 Early. More recently, he turned that analytical prowess to examining, uh, the rise in sudden deaths, particularly among the young in the past two years. The result is this book cause Unknown, the Epidemic of Sudden Death in 2021 and 2022, which seeks to encourage data driven discussion regarding two questions in a post covid world. One, what caused this historic spike, uh, in deaths among younger people. And two, what has caused the shift from old people who, uh, you know, who are expected to die at some point, um, to younger people who are expected to go on living. So, ed, thank you for joining us. Speaker 1 00:02:02 Thank you. Thank you so much for having me. I appreciate you Speaker 0 00:02:05 Joining us from, from Maui to Malibu. Uh, all right. Let's talk about, you know, the, the motivation behind this book in early 2021, if I understand, you started seeing these alarming stories about young exceptionally, uh, fit athletes dropping, uh, dead or having, uh, cardiac arrest, uh, in on the field of, of play. We just had another one of those, uh, reports yesterday. LeBron James' son, uh, Bronny James, 18 years old, uh, fortunately is, seems to be recovering, but you suspected that these were more than just tragic anecdotes and explored whether, uh, they represented a trend. Is that correct? And, and what did you find? Speaker 1 00:02:50 Yeah, correct. So, you know, look, let's, let's just talk about what I did for a living on Wall Street. I'm into pattern recognition, and my job was to be first to a signal ahead of my peers. And, you know, a lot of times, uh, things change, uh, uh, slowly and then suddenly, then swiftly. And so my job was to get ahead of that. And when the va I didn't take the vaccine, uh, for three reasons. Uh, you know, I didn't know, uh, uh, I, I didn't, I didn't trust the fact that it was experimental and had never been tested on humans. Uh, I knew that it took seven to 10 years for safety data to really be accumulated. And, uh, I also didn't like the idea of operation warp speed. That sounded like a ridiculous thing to say, because when you rush, I understand manufacturing processes. Speaker 1 00:03:40 So I, I was already suspect, and I was, my whole, you know, raison dere early on was, I'll wait. I'll see what happens. And sure, and sure enough, very early on, anecdotally, soccer players were collapsing in the uk, uh, uh, at a rate, which, you know, I, I grew up, we had Len Bias when I was younger. He had a little heart problem. Cocaine may have been involved, and that was a big news item. I mean, his death was a big, big news item. And those sudden deaths of athletes were big news items. What I found interesting was there were the, I was seeing these, uh, and again, I'm an avid, uh, alternative news follower, so I was seeing videos of soccer players collapsing, started getting, uh, stories of high school football players collapsing. And so this was something that I hadn't seen, uh, when I was growing up. Speaker 1 00:04:29 So I knew something was off. Then on, on my own, uh, island, people were reporting feeling severely ill after getting, you know, the shot. And so I suspected that, uh, the safety of this thing was a disaster. Uh, and, you know, I was relying on the regulatory bodies, and like all of us, the, you know, the, the, these watchdogs supposedly were supposed to like, you know, pull this thing. There was precedence for this in, in, in, uh, the swine, uh, flu vaccine debacle of the seventies. There were only 25 deaths, and they pulled it 25. And from my understanding, talking to some of the frontline doctors, the doctors who went against the narrative early and were canceled, they said the signal was in the VAs uh, reporting system in February of 2021. So I was just, you know, wondering why nothing was being done, nothing was being done. Speaker 1 00:05:23 Then the mandates came. Uh, that's when I lost my mind personally. I said, there's no way I am gonna let anybody, uh, inject me. So I was, uh, I did the worst case scenario in my head, and I said to myself, well, I'm willing to live in the jungles of ha and a loin cloth, and I'll be happy with that. That's, you know, it was scary you to go back. It was scary times. People were, you know, you couldn't work. You couldn't eat, um, uh, you couldn't eat, you couldn't work. Sorry. Phone, phone call came in, um, couldn't work, couldn't eat. And, um, uh, and so I, I started doing protests on Maui, Maui. I was already, I already had a Twitter following of 16,000. I was saying, uh, all sorts of things about what was going on. And, uh, I hooked up with Dr. Speaker 1 00:06:13 Malone in, uh, October of 2021. I told him, you know, I think this thing's, uh, super unsafe. And if, if I'm correct, it'll show up in insurance reports and funeral home reports, meaning insurance companies will lose money, and funeral homes will make money. And sure enough, that happened, and that happened with, uh, uh, great fanfare in the fourth and first quarter of, uh, fourth quarter of 21, first quarter of 22, I started to get a following, and I, uh, appeared on, uh, uh, an alternative media program, and I made a, uh, I said, look, I need, I wanna be a lightning rod. I need experts to help me. And sure enough, people started approaching me. And so I have a team behind me. I have insurance whistleblowers, I have PhD physicists that I founded a company with who are from finance. Um, and we are number crunchers. Speaker 1 00:07:03 And the data we accumulated over the last year and a half is a disaster and devastating. And I, um, I had no intention of writing a book. But then in August of 2022, Gavin de Becker, who lives on Maui as well, and, uh, he wrote a couple books, the Gift of Fear, and, uh, just two seconds about his business', personal security, and preventing, uh, corporal, uh, damage to people that he, his clients, he protects people, uh, and provides security. He was friendly with Bobby Kennedy and Tony Lyons of Scott Harris publishing. And the three of them, uh, pitched me the book, uh, that my message and the way I was coming at it was different from ev everybody else's, and that I was just a numbers guy. So Gavin wanted to, uh, pitch the idea of talking about sudden athletic deaths. I said, that's too anecdotal. Why don't we marry the two together? Speaker 1 00:07:55 So we did. And that the result was a book of what we know intuitively is gone off the rails. Um, this never happened when we were, uh, kids. And anecdotally, there is a study that was done called the Luane Study. Uh, it's in my book. It, it, it, it tried to quantify sun athletic deaths globally. It was a 38 year study, and they found, and it ended in 2000. Well, they, they did the study going back, uh, 38 years. The study was 2006. And in 2006, they, they found that there were 29 on average, 29 sudden athletic deaths, uh, per year. Speaker 0 00:08:32 Sudden athletic desk death. Yeah, yeah. Speaker 1 00:08:36 That's on the field or, or on the way to the hospital. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, like, Speaker 0 00:08:39 You dropped it. And was this, was this, that, that study, was that of, you know, every, every place in the world? Or was it focused on particular countries? It Speaker 1 00:08:47 Was global. Uh, so there was, there was 29 on average a year. Speaker 0 00:08:53 A year. A year, okay. Over the course of, so Speaker 1 00:08:55 Since, since 2021, we'd be lucky to have one month with just 29. In my book alone, there's hundreds and hundreds of examples. So again, anecdotally, you know, the, the frequency of this, this phenomenon, which admittedly did occur. So it did occur, but not at the rate that we were seeing starting in 2021. So now we're at the point where, just in my book alone, uh, you know, it's a tenfold re, uh, increase over what we saw annually, and people have been tracking and monitoring it, and it, some people are saying it's, it's even higher. Um, we just, you just reported LeBron James' son. I don't comment in specific cases, uh, because I don't know what happened. But I will say, chalk that up to another, uh, statistic of, of frequency of something occurring that, uh, is alarming. So we talk about that in the book. And then I go through what we call metadata, all cause mortality, excess deaths. Speaker 0 00:09:52 Yeah. So let's talk about the, the, uh, all cause mortality, statistics, you know, just for the layman, um, that may not understand what we're talking about. What are they, how are they determined? How have they changed? Um, say from before the pandemic one would expect, uh, that they would've gone up during, you know, 20 19, 20 20. Uh, but then looking, so looking at it, you know, in before that, in the two earlier two thousands, through Covid I d and then, uh, looking at what happened after that. Um, yeah, Speaker 1 00:10:33 So Speaker 0 00:10:33 Through that, and I think we also have a, a, a graph that we can show when we talk about the shift in terms of the all cause mortality. Yeah. Speaker 1 00:10:41 So, so the all cause mortality is just everybody who dies in a country. Those are death sta statistics and insurance companies, um, price off of figuring out what that rate is to the decimal point. And death rates are stable and predictable. And obviously, as you age, uh, you know, if, if you've never had an insurance policy and you're 60 and you want to go get one, it's gonna cost you a lot more than if you're 20. Why is that? Well, the, the death rates of a 20 year old are very predictable versus a 60 year old, they're very predictable. Obviously, the, the chance of you dying at 60 is much, much higher, much, much higher. So they establish what's called, you know, baseline all cause mortality for the whole population. So the whole, let's just use the US for example. US has a baseline death rate, and the numbers are pretty steady over time. Speaker 1 00:11:33 I talk about that in my book, obviously with Covid. Uh, there were what we call excess deaths, excess above. And there's a def a bunch of different ways to calculate this. Some people use a five year average before the year, you're measuring other people, uh, adjust for, uh, uh, uh, population growth, which is what we do. That's the preferred method. And more accurate, because if the country is growing, it'll make excess deaths, uh, look more extreme. And if it's declining, it'll make it look less extreme. So we, we actually adjust for population, which is the proper way to measure it. So what we found was, was there, were there excess deaths in the us? Sure, there are about 500,000 excess deaths in the US above the baseline. And it was mostly old people in 2020, mostly old 2020, okay. 20, 25,000. So 500. And, you know, the, the, we can discuss, uh, uh, we can discuss, uh, all sorts of things about what happened there, but we won't get into that. Speaker 1 00:12:32 Um, uh, and then there were about 500,000 excess deaths in, uh, 2021. What was surprising was the mix shift. We, we shifted from old to young for in, for example, uh, millennials. There are about 40,000 millennials who died excessively all cause mortality in 20, 20, 60,000 died, uh, excessively in 2021. That's a 50% increase. Now, what, what do we know about the virus? The virus was getting less, uh, virulent as time rolled on. And we also know that what we know, what was said in 2020 by the authorities was this was a D disease mostly that affected the old, so young people weren't at risk. So something happened in 2021, and this is table that I'm showing is called the Society of Actuaries. These are not my numbers, these are their numbers. These are claims, uh, that were paid out above, um, normal, and a hundred is normal, and the percent above that is excess. Speaker 1 00:13:34 So you can see that millennials, uh, the age groups 25 through 44 were having excess deaths in Q one, Q three, Q 4, 20 20, Q one, Q two, running around 30%. Then there was an event that occurred in 2021 in the third quarter, where 84% excess mortality occurred. Now, my hype, my hypothesis is that event was mandates and, uh, vaccinations, uh, uh, and that was what we call a temporal event. The slope of the rise is so extreme that something happened. And people have said, ed, you know, you're wrong. And, and let me describe this. This is, this is group life policies. These are policies that you get when you onboard to a Fortune 500 company or a mid-size company that offers these benefits. And what you do is you, day one, you go on your app, you sign up for your healthcare plan, and then you sign your death benefit and disability benefit that you, that if while you're, you have to be employed to get this, you, you get a usually one or two times base salary, depending upon your level. Speaker 1 00:14:43 And it's a di minimis amount of money. And when you're young, it's a joke. I signed many of these I never expected to collect 'cause I wasn't thinking about dying. And in the third quarter of 2021, uh, this is, this represents 80% of the revenues of the US group life insurance policy businesses across different insurance companies. They, they saw 84% spike Now, so that, that, that, that's, that's smoking gun number one, as far as I'm concerned, for the full year, all ages 25 through 64 experienced, uh, 40% excess mortality, 40% for those age groups, the working age population. What was interesting was the general US population in that same year, 2021, experienced 32% excess mortality. What do we know about employed people? By the very nature of the fact they get themselves to work, they're healthier than the general US population. And they have a, and this group in particular had access to the best of the best healthcare programs. Speaker 1 00:15:48 Uh, additionally, the Society of Actuaries has done studies. Why, this is why it's such a great lucrative business. Um, young people aren't expected to die. And they, they showed in, in a 2016 study that in any given year, their population died at one third, the mortality rate of the general US population in normal times. So their, their, their, their group just didn't die well in 2021 that flipped for the first time in history where their, their, um, chance of dying was higher than the general US population, which really makes no sense, unless, you know, my thesis is correct, which I believe it is that it was, it was due to the vaccination programs that caused, uh, but just Speaker 0 00:16:32 So we, we know how to interpret this, this chart, um, as you said, a hundred percent would be, it's in line with kind of recent historic all cause mortality. Yeah. So, uh, so anything that we're seeing in green is kind of, you know, more or less in the ballpark, or it's, or it's below. Yep. Uh, the, the historic and the yellow is, is all what is sort of significantly above baseline. And then the orange and the red are like really unusual 200%, uh, right. Increase in, in all cause mortality among that age group. So, yeah. Speaker 1 00:17:13 Yeah. And let me, let me wrap some statistics around this for those who understand statistics. Um, the, the c e O of one America, Scott Davison, he didn't, he didn't know why this was going on, but he said in the younger co the working younger working age people like 25 through 50, he said, a 10% increase in, in excess mortality, just 10% is a three standard deviation event, which on Wall Street, and in statistics is a, an anomaly. It happens 0.03% of the time, or point 0.3% of the time, time. So it's, it's an, it's, it's an observation that is so far off the normal, the normal average that it's, it's called a, um, it's called a, uh, it is approaching black swan event. It's a big signal. He said 40% is off the chart. And he said that a 10% standard deviation was a once in a 200 year event or a flood. Speaker 1 00:18:13 Like, it was like, it just doesn't happen. Well, guess what? We had 40%. And he said, those numbers are just off the charts. So, so, you know, this is just not normal. And the fact that this elite group of the employed in our country at Fortune 500 midsize companies, which is where these policies reside, uh, took the brunt of the hit, which really shouldn't have happened in 2021. If, if the vaccine was working as advertised, these numbers should have been going plummeting back to normal. Instead, they went off the charts up and accelerated. And millennials experience, if you, if you look at the, if I was to chart this, like a graph, excess mortality went up in 2021, kind of, uh, kind of went flatlined for a couple quarters, and then it took off and spiked to a new all time high of 84% in the third quarter, which I call an event. Something happened there. And, you know, the only thing that makes sense to me is what I, what, what is what I think. But I've been told that, ed, you're wrong. Uh, there's, um, a lot of suicides and deaths of despair. There's a lot of drug overdoses and fentanyl and heroin use, and there's a lot of missed cancer screening appointments that happen. Well, Speaker 1 00:19:28 Temporally in the third quarter is such a fast, sharp rise. I find it hard to believe that the millennials at the best corporations had a suicide pact and decided to off themselves statistically in one quarter. I also find it hard to believe that these people who have to keep their, to get the benefit paid, and that would, would actually show up in those numbers. You have to be employed. It's hard to keep your job very long if you're a heroin or fentanyl user. So that, that makes no sense. And a massive dr. Speaker 0 00:20:02 So that, that chart that we just looked at, was that the Society of Actuaries Research Institute? Yeah. Report. Yeah. Okay. Speaker 1 00:20:08 Correct. It's their numbers. It's their numbers, not mine. Speaker 0 00:20:12 Yeah. Uh, and so what did you find with regards to, you'd mentioned life insurance, funeral, uh, services. What's happened there? Speaker 1 00:20:23 Well, so funerals, so I'm a stock analyst. So I looked at the stocks of the funeral home companies, and of course, they went up, uh, during, uh, 2020. And then they started to trade back down, because the expectation even from the companies was, as we roll through covid and the vaccines rollout, trendline, uh, funeral services will, will, will go back to normal. So there was a, you know, so the, the market was anticipating initially, you know, a one-time bonanza, then back to normal. But then what happened, I, uh, strangely and oddly enough is the market started to discount an acceleration of growth. And the stocks took off and went into like new all time highs, uh, uh, for the public companies. There's a couple of 'em, service Corporation of America, and, uh, I forget the other one, but I, I monitored the two of those, and they were beating, and what's called, it's called beating and raising numbers. Speaker 1 00:21:16 So they were their same store sales, meaning the public, uh, funeral home companies roll up independence. Most of the 80% of the industry is privately owned funeral homes, but 20% is public. So that's the, that's what they do. So they, they were reporting what's called same store sales, which is the number of deaths. Uh, uh, and what that does is that xs out their growth through acquisition. So it's, it's, it's the true growth of the business. Their same store sales were just increasing. There, there were more and more, uh, services being done and or cremations just, it was, it was, the number was alarming and it accelerated in 2021. Uh, it, it was, it was very alarming. The stocks took up recently, uh, the executive a couple quarters ago, c e o of, uh, service scope of America said, look, uh, we've been expecting this to normalize, and it's no longer like they were blaming it on covid. Speaker 1 00:22:11 They said, these are non covid deaths we're seeing not related to Covid, and it's become more permanent. And they didn't say why. They just said, so they ratified the current growth rate as more normal. So that's, that's so, so you have the funeral homes became growth stocks. The insurance companies started losing money. They're, uh, I've had, I have some whistleblowers and you just, you won't believe this, but they, they internally haven't figured this out yet. There's still, there's a growing number of people who have figured it out. But, you know, it's hard, it's hard to communicate this to people. So it's, it's a battle. Um, what they've done is they've, they've just raised prices, but I still get access to the all cause mortality, uh, claims. And then in the millennial age group, it's still running around 23%, which is horrendous. So ages 25 through Speaker 0 00:23:01 Higher, higher than baseline. Speaker 1 00:23:02 Higher than baseline. And, and, and, and, and, and, uh, that is not good at all. And, uh, their, their short-term disability businesses and their long-term disability businesses are taking on more losses, and they're now becoming alarmed about it because they, they internally were all projecting these trends to normalize, and they're, some of them are accelerating. So it's a problem. This is the numbers are the numbers. Yeah. Speaker 0 00:23:28 So we, we've been talking about, um, the, the rise in all cause mortality, but particularly the shift, uh, to a certain age group. But, uh, I mean, if there's something going on, one would also expect that it would, would show up with people who, who survived. Right. Um, but maybe who, uh, received an injury or with disabled. Um, you know, there's a lot of great stuff in this book, and including that you do talk a little bit about, uh, disability claims, but, uh, also you are continuing to, uh, uncover, you know, data as since publication one of those, I think you just dropped some new findings regarding, uh, UK's personal independence payment or PIP for disabilities. Speaker 1 00:24:18 Yeah. Before we get to that, let's just, I want to quickly illustrate to your audience, uh, Denmark, which is a great case study. Um, the first chart in Denmark, Denmark, uh, shows two, two graphs, and it's, it's, uh, the whole population. Speaker 0 00:24:33 Yeah, I think we have that chart. So let's, let's show it. Yeah. Speaker 1 00:24:36 Yeah. So what's interesting about this is you can see the death rate, uh, in Denmark on the left took off. It was trending down because death rates tend to trend down as healthcare improves and lifestyles improves. So Denmark had a good trend of, uh, of, of their death rate for their population adjusted going down. Then it took off in, uh, 2020. And on the right you can see all cause mortality, uh, took off and was 2020, uh, 2021 was greater than 2020, and 2022 was greater than 2020. Uh, it's a disaster. This is a disaster. So whatever the Denmark did, um, uh, what ended up in more people dying as time went on excessively. Now, let's go look at the age groups. Um, I, we, we, we can analyze, these are the age cohorts, and you can see that every year, especially amongst the young, the younger groups, uh, on the left, they got devastated as time rolled on. Speaker 1 00:25:36 And their excess mortality increased every year subsequent to, uh, you know, the, the, the pandemic year. So this is, this is a disaster. So what did Denmark do? Uh, as I was writing the book, it's controversial. 'cause I say they banned the vaccine for under 50. They didn't say that, but they effectively banned the vaccine for under 50. They're no longer offering boosters, and they recommend that you, it's better to get covid than the vaccine, which is, you know, Orwellian speak for your chances of, uh, uh, surviving are better with covid than the vaccine. And so Denmark is an example of a country that had such horrendous, uh, results from their policies that they have effectively banned the vaccine for under 50. Speaker 0 00:26:20 Okay. So just so we understand what we're looking at, so in blue is excess deaths above baseline for Denmark. Speaker 1 00:26:32 Yeah. And, and that's 20, I think it's 20 20, 20 21 and 2022. Speaker 0 00:26:37 Yeah. So, so the blue is, is 2020 for all of these different age groups? Correct. So I guess what's surprising is that, uh, you have excess, okay? You have excess deaths in 2020 for the, the 15 to, so you basically, you have excess deaths for ex except maybe, you know, one to 14 where you, Speaker 1 00:27:09 Right, right, Speaker 0 00:27:10 Right. So, but, so other than children, but teenagers, young adults, um, basically, uh, all saw increases in these years, Speaker 1 00:27:26 Correct? Uh, each year is subsequently more, uh, unfavorable than the prior. Yeah. So, so Bill, let's pretend I'm wrong. Let's say my thesis is wrong. Whatever Denmark did resulted in, uh, whatever their combination of policies, it resulted in more death than protection of life. So, interesting. At the very, at the very minimum, the Denmark healthcare authorities need to be fired. Everyone that was involved. Speaker 0 00:27:56 So, and, and, uh, Denmark, all of these, uh, Norwegian, uh, Scandinavian countries were, are, uh, pretty heavily vaccinated, right? So, I mean, we have, Speaker 1 00:28:09 Yeah, Denmark, Denmark is one of the highest rates. Speaker 0 00:28:12 Okay. Um, yeah. So they took different kinds of policies with regards to lockdowns and things like that, and mask policies. But with regards to vaccination, um, pretty, pretty much the, the same. Uh, alright, so I'm glad you let's, Speaker 1 00:28:33 Yeah, let's talk about the disability data. I'll start in the us. So we discovered a database called the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. It, it's the, those are the folks who are known for giving us the employment numbers. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, they, you know, they, they, they do a monthly survey and their monthly survey asks your employment status and a whole host of other questions. One of which is, are you disabled? And if so, are you unable to work? And, uh, that resulted in, uh, a, uh, this survey done every month. It's just a survey, so we don't know what the underlying cause is. It's a statistical survey of 40,000, um, phone calls that go out to different individuals in the country, 40 to 60,000. And the, and it changes every month. You know, they don't interview the same people every month. They may keep you interviewed for three months, but they sh they, they shift, they shifted every now and then. Speaker 1 00:29:24 And, uh, the numbers of disabilities, uh, took off in 2021, you can see on the right, the vaccination uptake and then the disability, uh, rate of change. And it was alarming. It was a three standard deviation rate of change. And we run, ran a correlation of the disabilities and the vaccination rollout program. And it's 0.91, I think, uh, now they all say correlation is not causation fine. But then we looked into the numbers even deeper, and we found that, um, the general US population's disability rate went up 8%. The employed population's disability rate went up 34% and or 31%. And then, so, so, and of the 3.2 million absolute disabled individuals who identified as disabled 1.7 million were, were employed. So more than half of the newly disabled came from the employed ranks. Very curious. Usually those are the most healthy amongst us, and again, not expected to get disabled. Speaker 1 00:30:32 Uh, then we broke it down to between employed men and employed women, employed women are around 38, 30 9%, uh, disability rate up and, uh, employed men 19%. So whatever's going on is affecting women more. Uh, and we're hearing that from Naomi Wolfe and others who've done work on the Pfizer clinical trial analysis, where 70% of the adverse events appear to be women for some reason. So whatever's going on is disproportionately affecting women, which I, I would think would be of great concern to feminists and women's groups personally. Um, so they, they need to know what's going on in their own population. Um, so yeah, let's Speaker 0 00:31:12 Talk about women for a second. And I, I do wanna get to, uh, we've got a lot of questions coming in, so I wanna make sure that we, we get to those. But, uh, you know, I've heard anecdotal reports of, of menstrual disorders, uh, but has that been measured, um, systematically. Uh, also, again, women's health reports about miscarriages or stillbirths. Speaker 1 00:31:36 Yeah. So we, we haven't done the analysis on the, on the birth, the birth problem. And the reason we haven't is because we're, we have a lot of integrity and honesty, and birth rates fluctuate over time. So it's noisy data, they go up, they go down. So they're down right now. Uh, so we can't definitively say they're down. Um, what we can say is that this trend persists, meaning if we roll into next year and the year after, and the birth rate stay, the, the birth rate stays low and still births are, you know, are still high, then we have what's called a persistence of trend. And then that's, that, that'll be when we come in and analyze that data. But honestly, uh, it, it, it's, it's noise right now, and that we have to be honest about it, that we can't, we, we can't get a standard deviation that throws off a signal, but they're down and it's a problem. Speaker 1 00:32:27 And if it continues and persists, uh, Houston, we have a problem. Okay. Um, you know, you know, a, as we talk about the UK uh, PIP data, we were able to go into underlying causes. And what's interesting is there's something called diseases of the ovary, uterus, cervix, vagina, and vulva. And the, um, the, the, the rate of incidences is just really bad. Uh, they're up over the trend in 2022. They're up 304% over trend in 2022. And obviously this is, this affects women. The stan standard deviation of this trend in the UK from this new data is 14, 14 standard deviations, which is what we call a black swan event. So, you know, we ha this data we have, uh, that we just uncovered, which I'll talk about. Uh, we're not doctors. We have like, um, 20 body systems with, you know, 300 underlying causes in those body systems. Speaker 1 00:33:28 There's so much data, it's so alarming and so off the hook, you can see here, these human systems are up, uh, in 2022 over, over trend. This is excess over the four year prior trend. You can see it accelerates every year, which is alarming to us because whatever's happened to the, to the population in the UK is getting worse. The hematological stands out. That's blood disorders, blood issues. That's 522% more claims cleared, claims actually being paid that like, uh, lemme describe the database. The database is a, a government, uh, disability system. And 40% of the claims are usually cleared and paid. 60% are denied. That ratio has not changed throughout the whole pandemic. There was a log jam in processing the orders due to the pandemic and the lockdowns that peaked in August of 2021. At 26 weeks. In 2022, it came down to 16 weeks, and now it's running 14 weeks. Speaker 1 00:34:28 So the 2022 data doesn't have any delays or log jams in it. So that's why we caution people when they look at the monthly, we, we run these numbers monthly and yearly. When you're looking at the monthly data, the 2021 figures may be a little all over the place, but there's such strong signals here. It's so alarming. We, uh, we are, we're actually kind of, kind of at finance technology. We were saddened and depressed to see this data. So we've presented this data, and the UK pension system has this problem. It's either massive fraud, and if so, they need to investigate it or it's something else. And that's something else is so alarming that it needs to be addressed. So we, we, we, if people don't agree with us in the UK about, or the, the, the people who run this system with our thesis, that's fine. Speaker 1 00:35:19 But you need to talk about why this is occurring. Are, are you, uh, subjected to massive fraud, or is there something so horrendous going on in the uk? You need to investigate it, but needs to be addressed by the regulators. This data, as my partner, Yuri, uh, Nunes said, he said they can't run from this data. It's so bad and devastated. The signals are just off the hook at this point. I'm incredulous and, um, saddened because this, we suspect this is probably going on in the US as well. We don't have access to this kind of data. We're trying, uh, other people are trying to get access, put in FOIA requests. If anybody gets access to disability data, this granular in the us, send it to us. Show us where to find it, and we will do the analysis. 'cause that's all we do. You get, get us the data. We count it. Speaker 0 00:36:10 All right. Um, we are gonna, I'm gonna take a pause from my questions and go to some of our, um, audience questions. Uh, on Instagram. Our friend, my modern Gaul asks, uh, ed, if you have statistics that show how much or how little people went to the doctors during Covid lockdowns, did people become more unhealthy because they were scared to get their regular checks? You know, I think you go through what some of the alternate explanations for this might be, and, and then you kind of kick the tires with that. And what about people that say, oh, well, it's just, uh, people that, you know, didn't get their mammograms or this or that, and so the illnesses weren't, weren't caught, or, you know, heart inflammation wasn't caught, that kind of thing. Speaker 1 00:37:03 Well, let's talk about the Society of Actuaries table. There was an event that occurred in Q three and for people to say that they missed their cancer screening appointments. Well, first of all, let's, let's be honest, no one in, in between 25 and 44 is actually getting tested for cancer. Cancer gets tested when you present with an illness. When you go to the doctor and something's wrong, then they start doing tests. No one runs cancer tests for the hell of it. They just don't. There's, I mean, and again, uh, this age group, 25 through 44, uh, missing medical appointments does not result in mass death in one quarter. So I find this, did people miss doctor's appointments? Sure. And if you're old and you're 70 and you missed one, you might've died because they couldn't catch something. But when you're 25, when you're 26, no, I've never been tested for cancer. I've never asked for a cancer screening test. I'm 56. No one's ever asked me to do one. So that whole hypothesis of like annual cancer screening tests is absurd. The insurance companies would not pay for that. They, they do the test. When you go to the doctor and you're feeling crummy and they can't figure out what it is, they say, well, maybe let's do some blood work. Oh, this may. Then they do a test. This doesn't happen. 'cause you missed your doctor's appointment. It's just absurd. Speaker 0 00:38:22 All right. Candace Morena on Facebook, um, asks, ed, have you seen any data regarding mental health statistics and how it might relate to your graphs? Speaker 1 00:38:31 Yeah, I'll, let me just go to psychiatric disorders. Um, it's, uh, yeah, mood and anxiety, uh, mixed anxiety and, and, uh, depressive disorders. Standard deviation is, um, seven and has really started accelerating in 2022. Mood disorders are up, uh, 11 standard deviations. Lemme give you the percentages for mood disorders, uh, up 106%. And, uh, 2021 was up 50%, and it's accelerated in 2022. You know, look, uh, I'm not, look, again, we're not doctors. So we, there's something that affects the neurology, uh, of the brain, we think from the vaccines. But again, we're not doctors. That's why we want doctors to look at this. But there's a mental health problem in the UK that's accelerated. And whether the vaccine causing it, I don't know. That's what we need. We need doctors. There has been chat that, you know, this thing can, uh, penetrate the blood, blood brain barrier. Again, we're not doctors, but the numbers of the numbers mental illness in the UK is on the rise. And, you know, anecdotally, I'm seeing on, on the island of Maui, people losing it. Speaker 0 00:39:50 Yeah. All right. Um, mark Staler on Twitter, X is asking, what's been the biggest pushback that you've received to your book and data analysis in general? Like, what is the, um, what's the reception been? Are people, some people being open-minded? Are you changing people's minds? Uh, is this book getting reviewed? Are you getting, uh, sort of a fair hearing on, on what you guys have assembled? Speaker 1 00:40:19 Uh, so the pushback there, really, I, I've not seen any real pushback, um, that I'm aware of. Maybe there are out there, but I, it hasn't been brought to my attention. Um, the reviews on Amazon are over 1500 at this point. Um, what I'm being told is someone buys the book, they read it, and they're like, and, and if they're on the fence or they're a little skeptical, and if the light bulb turns on, they buy 20 other books and then hand it to their friends and family. Look, the book is to illustrate. You're not, you haven't been told the truth. The the numbers are the numbers. If you don't think it's the vaccine, then what is it? And I, in the book, end the book by saying, I don't get into the who and the why don't care. Um, it just is. And at this point, it's a coverup. 'cause the data that we, we see the help authorities see, but they don't, rather than highlight them, they seem to be burying them because, you know, covid iss over, uh, we've declared victory, but the numbers are so bad now, they're getting worse than the award during the pandemic. Uh, it's, it's, it's tragic. So that the book is just numbers. And you d you don't have to agree with my thi theory, but you got to ask the question, why is no one talking about this? This is a joke. Speaker 0 00:41:35 At some point, you expect they will. I mean, uh, if this continues Speaker 1 00:41:42 <laugh>, uh, look, this is, in my humble opinion, this is the greatest scandal and fraud we've ever seen in the history of humanity. Um, governments will topple if they admit this. So I think this is gonna be a game of, uh, pretending it didn't happen. And I don't think there's any magic movie moment where like, you know, you know, I'm all, I'm, I'm testifying on the hill, and I, you know, I dropped the mic and we're all done. I think this is just a word of mouth. And over time, it'll be like the tobacco wars where litigation will occur. State's, attorney generals will get involved because their health budgets are getting affected and devastated. And when they do, they will sue and get discovery. And so this is, you know, this is gonna be like a process, but my job is to alert people to what's going on, uh, to try to convince them. Speaker 1 00:42:28 At the very least, if you have been taking it, don't take anymore. Because what we do know is it doesn't work. It doesn't prevent transmission, and it doesn't prevent you from getting covid. There's a claim that it prevents serious hospitalization. There's no study on that. That's what we call marketing material. They pivoted very quickly from, uh, you know, it prevents you from getting covid and transmitting it to this, this is the new story. It's a narrative shift without any evidence. I, there's no peer. Someone showed me a peer reviewed, reviewed paper that it, it, uh, you know, prevents you from serious hospitalization. And I, I would love to see it, but I haven't found, no one's shown me one yet. So, all right, at the very least, just don't take something that doesn't work. And I want the message to get out, because whatever's go, if I'm wrong, fine, I'll pull a 180. But you know, why not just stop now and tell your loved ones? I wrote this book for my loved ones and other people's loved ones. 'cause there's a different way of convincing you, I'm a Wall Street guy. My job was to be ahead of the curve. And this is, this is what I do. Speaker 0 00:43:29 Do. Uh, Ann m on YouTube, uh, asks, what about the claim that excess deaths was a covid resurgence? Uh, maybe we can put up that original chart. I don't know, Anne, if you were on with us at the beginning, um, you know, certainly there wa was a covid resurgence, but, uh, it was a, a much milder strain, right? So, um, yeah, so we were, and then also that these, they were hitting, you know, the, the excess deaths were showing up most significantly in, um, in people that were, you know, 25 to, uh, you know, basically people under 50. Speaker 1 00:44:12 Yeah, ba ba basically. The way the virus, the, the, the first one was the original. That was the worst. Then we had Delta, and Delta was around in, uh, April, may, June. And you, you can see that, uh, Q two of 2021 ends in June. Millennials didn't jump up in if Delta, there's, there was a thesis put forward that Delta affected young people more so than old people, which it was never proven. It was just a statement. Uh, it would've jumped up in June because people were coming down with Delta in, in, in in the second quarter. The numbers took off in the third quarter. What do we know about the third quarter, August, September, October timeframe? What do we know? We know that Biden signed an executive order that every company with over a hundred employees had to mandate the thing. Corporate America had started already jumping the gun. Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley mandated it in August. So Corporate America falls the big Fortune 500 were mandated ahead of Biden. Then Biden pulled everybody else who was resisting the log. So the decision to keep your job or, or, or, or or leave happened in the third quarter. And that's those numbers. That's my hypothesis why that number temporally went from 33% up to 84% for, you know, 25 through 44. These people aren't expected to die. They're just not. Right. It's a smoking gun that, that's one of my smoking guns. Speaker 0 00:45:37 Yeah, and I think Ann also, if you look at, um, in that, that, uh, chart that we just had up, if you look at the most, um, vulnerable population, right, which was the, the older, uh, populations in 2021, tho those are all in the green. So, um, I think that shows that if there, there was a, a resurgence of covid that was causing a lot of deaths, it would've shown up in the, that, in, in the most elderly segment of the population, rather than actually seeing those numbers in, in the normal range, or, um, Speaker 1 00:46:14 Well, yeah. And there was also another effect in 2020, we call it the, the dry tinder effect, meaning, right. People were already close to death and they, this thing took 'em out. And so we, we, we, we, you know, they may have died in a year or two. They were, we had this pull forward effect of old people right away in 2020. Speaker 0 00:46:34 Yeah. Um, so, uh, we covered that. The, uh, the, there doesn't seem to be a peer reviewed study that, um, would back up the consensus or the fallback position, which is that, um, vaccines prevent, uh, severe illness or death. Um, what, uh, we covered a lot of the research that, that, um, you include in this book. So what are some of the other findings that you have would like to talk about since publication? Speaker 1 00:47:09 Yeah, so we, we examined what's called absence rates and work time lost in the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. We found similar data in, in the uk. They match statistically, they look the same. Um, so what we've found is that, um, people seem to be, as a workforce getting sicker and not reporting to work as often. Absence rates went off the, it was, it was a 20 year trend in the US in 2022. Work time lost and absence rates work time loss went up, uh, 13 standard deviations, which is a black swan event, and it accelerated in 2022. So whatever's going on in the population, especially amongst the employed, they seem to be sicker and missing more work. And this is resulting in lost productivity. There's an economic costs there. Those who are not sick have to double up and cover for those who are sick. Speaker 1 00:48:05 These are just big anomalies. We're gonna drop a new report, uh, on absence rates and work time lost in the N H SS system in the uk. That's the hospital system. And of course, I'll preview it, it looks exactly similar to the UK and the us. So the hospital system where these people were all mandated to VA get vaccinated, are missing a lot of work. And if you're seeing delays in your healthcare, it's because people just aren't there to do the work. 'cause they're missing it. They may not be. So we, so we ident people who are chronically reporting is sick. We call injured than we have disabled, and then we have dead. So the injured are much greater in number. We put out a vaccine damage report where we estimated from the Pfizer clinical trial, um, uh, severe adverse event rates, what it would translate into in the population. And it's about 26.6 million people are presenting as injured, meaning just kind of chronically getting sick. Uh, the globally, the fear is though, globally, is Speaker 0 00:49:04 That, are the, is that globally or the us? Speaker 1 00:49:07 No, that's the us. Okay. Uh, GLO globally, you can impute a number with some back of the envelope map, but let's just not go there right now. Uh, so 26.6 million is our estimate. I think it's conservative. We're just chronic, chronic, chronically, chronically ill. Speaker 0 00:49:22 Mm-hmm. Speaker 1 00:49:22 <affirmative>, um, not disabled, still able to muddle through work and get there. Then we have, uh, we, we estimated 1.36 million people have been disabled from the vaccine. And, uh, 200, we, we have about 300,000 deaths in the us We've attributed to the vaccine. And again, the injured can become disabled, then the disabled can become the dead, or, you know, injury could go to dead. So that's what we're concerned about is that these things are, these trends are gonna continue. They have huge economic impacts. I mean, we're starting a hedge fund, and we put out economic research. So we are incorporating all this research into our economic analysis. We believe the unemployment rate is being distorted by the disability rate. And that the fed, again, this has real world impacts. The Federal Reserve is raising interest rates as they did today, because the employment number is low, while it's low, because there's fewer workers that are actually in the labor force. So they're, they're making what we call a policy mistake. And the recession that's coming is gonna be worse than, uh, anyone can imagine because they've kept rates too, too high for too long. And so, you know, if you think this is a, you know, just a bunch of dudes on the internet having some fun, we're incorporating this into a real business. We're raising money to make economic decisions, and we think we're on the cutting edge of this. Speaker 0 00:50:42 Um, you talked about this new research that you're going to be, um, uh, releasing. Where do we, is it, I know you're on Twitter and maybe we can put, um, his Twitter handle in the, uh, the comment sections, but what's the best way for us to, you know, keep track of you and your team and, and what you're bringing forward? And is there another book in the works between starting a hedge fund and <laugh>? Speaker 1 00:51:07 No, no. I, I, I have, there, I have no, uh, book deal lined up. Obviously. It probably will get updated. I mean, we've uncovered so many new things. There'll be, there'll be, there'll be another section, but that's not in the works right now. But I will say, um, go to Finance Technologies. It's spelled with the ph.com, finance technologies.com, pH, not n f. And you go to, uh, the humanities projects tab, and then projects. And this is a list of the projects. We have V Damage project, excess Mortality Mortality Project, which covers the US Europe, the uk, Germany, Australia, Ireland. We have US Dis Disabilities project. We go into a seven part series analyzing it, uh, versus the u you know, using the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. And we, we correlate that to the, uh, Pfizer clinical trials, uh, whole host of data there. We look at hospitalizations following vaccination and vs. Safe. We have the US B L s absence rates report project. We have the UK Disabilities Project, which we just posted. Uh, we have, uh, um, UK absence rate project, which, which is posted. We have the severe adverse events in the mRNA clinical trials. We have a Z vse project and, um, projects to come uk yellow card project, fertility project. So we have a project. So we have a team. I, I just want people to understand this isn't me. Yeah. Speaker 0 00:52:33 Tell, tell us a little bit about the team that you assembled. 'cause I, Speaker 1 00:52:36 Yeah, Speaker 0 00:52:37 Pretty Speaker 1 00:52:37 Impressive. Yeah. So, Carlos Allegria, Yuri Nunez are my partners in finance technologies. Carlos Allegria is a PhD physicist and also has a PhD in finance. He worked in Mo, a host of hedge funds and family offices. Prior to this project, he wrote a book called Economic Cycles, debt and Demographics. It's a fabulous book. Um, and Yuri is a standing professor. He's been in finance, uh, projects consulting. He's a standing professor at a university in Portugal. We have two data scientists who are volunteering at the moment from serious, uh, data scientist backgrounds. We have another PhD physicist who's volunteering. We have PR specialists hooking up with us to get, make sure we hone the message correctly. We have a Silicon Valley, uh, executive who's joining our team. We have have two editors. Uh, we have, we have a team, and the team is gelling well, and we're working well together. Speaker 1 00:53:32 And, uh, we're all doing it pro bono. Most people have day jobs. I don't have a day job yet. Neither does Carlos. So Carlos and I are the ones without day jobs, but everybody else got a day job. But they're doing the work. And, uh, what I think is most beautiful about this is, is, um, the volunteer effort and people really caring. No one here, you know, if people wanna accuse us of Grifting there, there's no money in this yet. There's no money. So we're putting the data out for free. You can go to our website, do whatever you want with it, you know, if you want to write a, a rebuttal to it, that's, uh, got some of your own data and it's, uh, you know, the data is in garbage, we'll take a look at it and we'll, uh, we'll have fun. But most mo most people have not come at us with actually their own data. Speaker 0 00:54:17 Interesting. All right. I'm gonna get this one last audience question, uh, from Facebook. Ja Jackson Sinclair asks, do you think there are any politicians, uh, that are looking into this or trying to push for more accountability? Speaker 1 00:54:33 So I, I testified in December, uh, in front of Senator Ron Johnson. He is one of the advocates of what's gone on here. He doesn't have any power currently 'cause he is in the min minority in the Senate. So he has no power to convene committees. Um, the G O P house does have power, and myself and Dr. Malone and Dr. McCull and other doctors are wondering when we're gonna get called to testify that this, that doesn't seem, so, I put pressure on the G O P that's supposedly, uh, running things to hold hearings on this data. They haven't yet. I di I did go to Australia, um, uh, about a month and a half ago. And Australia, believe it or not, there's a core group of people they're resisting. And an MP there reached out to me. I had a call with him. He's gonna try to find data in his own country that we can analyze and assist his efforts there. So we, I, you know, I have politicians working with me. I've worked with Senator Ron Johnson. I'd love to work with Marjorie Taylor Green, supposedly running the Covid Investigation Committee, but she hasn't reached out to me yet. Speaker 0 00:55:39 Um, and then other than Denmark, who, as you said, um, extremely highly vaccinated now not recommending, um, vaccine for anyone under 50, any other countries, uh, following this lead? Speaker 1 00:55:56 Uh, there were some, there were some, uh, pausing in the uk, but Denmark's the big, the big one as far as I'm concerned. And, uh, we need, I I, when I was in Australia, I, I spoke before 2,500 individuals in a, in a, in a theater. And I, I I, I, I proposed a challenge to them. I said, look, you guys all ran over the cliff together, for the most part. Not I, I said, those of you in the room, maybe not, but your whole country ran, ran off the cliff. There's only 25 million of you. Uh, maybe you can, uh, pull a 180 and get United going the other way just as quickly. 'cause I, and I made the challenge, shame the Yanks pull this thing before we do in the us. So I'm trying, I'm trying to set up a competition. Speaker 0 00:56:37 All right, well, uh, thanks for doing that. Thank you for this fantastic book again, everyone, uh, cause unknown the Epidemic of Sudden Deaths in 2021 and 2022. Uh, again, those, those, you know, statistics we, we showed earlier are undeniable, um, particularly with regards to the excess mortality, uh, among young people, um, having spiked. And so I think it's wonderful that you are shining light on this. And, um, hopefully we will, uh, get some people willing to open their eyes and, and give it a look and, uh, like you said, uh, rebut it and bring forward alternate explanations. So I appreciate Speaker 1 00:57:20 It. Absolutely, absolutely. Conversation is welcome. But no one wants to talk about this. Speaker 0 00:57:26 Well, we, we, we talked about it today and I think, uh, Speaker 1 00:57:29 No. Well, you and I did, but, but the authorities <laugh>. Speaker 0 00:57:32 Yes. Yeah. Well, uh, thanks again. And I wanna also thank everyone else who, uh, joined us today, asked the great questions. If you enjoyed this video, um, or any of our other materials or programming, please remember, Atlas Society is a nonprofit, so you can support our work by making a tax deductible [email protected]. Please be sure to tune in next week when, uh, psychologist Jay Michael Bailey, uh, he's An expert in, uh, gender dysphoria, uh, particularly rapid onset gender dysphoria, um, research for which he, he, uh, has, has recently come under a lot of pressure. So we wanna ask him a few questions as well. So we'll see you next week. Thanks.

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